Quantcast

News

Experts say Girls with Autism may be underdiagnosis due to ‘Social Camouflage’

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, boys are diagnosed with autism far more often than girls every year. However, the gap between the genders may not be as stark as once believed. Dr. Louis Kraus, a psychiatrist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago with a specialty in autism, attributes the seemingly wide gender gap to the idea that symptoms of autism are less apparent in young girls. This is because girls can blend into normal social situations better than boys, who “tend to be more isolative,” Kraus explained in an interview with NPR.org. While autism can be more easily diagnosed in boys at an early age, girls may not be diagnosed until a later age or may even go undiagnosed because symptoms don’t manifest as distinctly early on. NPR.org’s article ‘Social Camouflage’ May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls shares the story of Los Angeles native…

Enhanced Resources for Autism Through Telehealth

The opportunities to obtain advanced services for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are typically limited for rural families. Even though there are state and federal requirements for funding to assist these families, the ability to hire and retain sufficient resources to meet these needs is rare. Alacia Stainbrook summarizes the dilemma in The Challenges of Autism in Small-Town America, explaining that in states like Iowa, as many as half of the 8,000 children with autism reside in rural areas. Professionals using videoconferencing at the University of Iowa, University of Missouri, Vanderbilt, and others, have developed programs that can reduce wait times, provide access to the most efficient resources, and ease the burden of distance for these families. The initial implementations of the program included in-person visits for the initial assessment and a follow-up visit months…

Robot Helps Students with Autism at Manor ISD Summer Camp

While summer camps traditionally bring to mind barbecues and dive boards, one group of students are having their fun in the sun by exploring the fields of Computer Science. Children at Manor ISD’s ShadowGlen Elementary School have taken part in a number of programming and coding courses meant to encourage engagement with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) related education, through the use of the Robots4STEM. Developed by Dallas-based company RoboKind, the program was created to help students learn the basics of coding. Manor ISD’s Robotics Camp, which brought together an integrated group of students with and without autism, which is one example of the potential for Robots4STEM, demonstrating the benefits of including developmental courses for autistic students in schools that, in turn, simultaneously encourage STEM education. “They’re not afraid of technology,” said Chad…

RoboKind Makes Ladders’ List of Powerful Robot “Overlords”

When it comes to the subject of robotics, opinions seem divisively split. For some, robotics holds the promise of a bright future filled with technological progress and luxury. For others, the robots are ready to take our jobs. Artificial intelligence is progressing much faster than almost anyone could have expected. It’s important to understand the level of intelligence that has been developed in this field. Among the many examples of how far robotics has come is the work of Dallas-based company RoboKind, whose robot named Milo was selected as one of the six most powerful robots in the world today in a recent ranking conducted by Ladders. Developed by RoboKind as a socially advanced robot that stands two feet tall, Milo provides support in the development of social and communication skills for children with autism. Through consistent speech patterns and behavior repetition, Milo…

Keeping an Eye on Personal Growth for People with Autism

For individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), even something as seemingly small as eye contact can prove difficult. While the avoidance of eye contact is traditionally interpreted as a sign of indifference or disinterest, many with autism suggest that the act can feel uncomfortable or even painful for them, like a burning sensation in their eyes. A team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging are working to shed light on the mechanisms of the brain associated with eye contact, with their findings being recently published in a Scientific Reports paper online. Nouchine Hadjikhani, MD, PhD, director of neurolimbic research at the Martinos Center and corresponding author of the new study, stated, “Contrary to what has been thought, the apparent lack of interpersonal interest among people with autism is not due to a lack…

Milo and Beam help students succeed in school

Online classes have made it easier for people around the world to get the educations they desire, but for some students, nothing beats a real classroom setting. The Asahi Shimbun joins Beam, a telepresence robot developed by IT instructor Morten Jacobsen and teacher Francis Norgaard from Denmark, as the robot helps 13-year-old Yusuf Warsame attend class. Yusuf suffers from a genetic mutation that creates tumors throughout his body and requires he stay in a controlled environment to avoid harmful bacteria that students encounter daily. He controls Beam, a 5-foot-2-inch robot on three wheels with a mini-HD screen for a head, with his computer. Cameras, microphones, and speakers allow for Yusuf to participate in class. The state school that Yusuf attends has two Beam robots and RoboKind’s Milo (Zeno in Europe), an advanced social robot that helps students with autism develop social…

Fewer States Meeting Special Ed Obligations, Robotic Support May Provide Solution

In Disabilityscoop.com’s report, Feds Find Fewer States Meeting Special Ed Obligations, the annual review conducted by the U.S. Department of Education resulted in a failing grade. Federal education officials discovered that a total of only 22 states were capable of meeting obligations to adequately serve students with disabilities, following a mandatory assessment of state compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This determination is based on the overall quality of student performance and functional outcomes for students with disabilities, along with each state’s ability to follow through with procedural responsibilities such as the completion of special education evaluations. In a drop from last year’s satisfactory designation, previously awarded to 24 states, this decline reflects the unfortunate reality of the state of special education in the United…

Inconsistent Early Intervention Service Adoption in States

Resources are available for children under the age of 3 to attain services for developmental disabilities in each of the United States. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) created a federal mandate designed to ensure that children with disabilities will have access to publicly funded and appropriate educational services up to the age of 21. The IDEIA is national in scope, however the implementation is left to the states, which has created a discrepancy in how the services are made available to the people in each state. A recent article in Science Daily, Enrollment in early intervention services may be influenced by administering agency, highlighted the findings of a study published in the Journal of Early Intervention, concerning research from the University of Oregon. Erica Twardzik, Megan MacDonald, and Alicia Dixon-Ibarra found that many children…

Contemporary Context Comes Calling

Everywhere you look on social media, there seems to be a spark that boils over into a raging argument, igniting comment threads across the web with repugnant manifestos of mockery and depraved attitudes. Behind the veil of anonymity, the internet can quickly become like a digitized bathroom stall, scribbled over with trash talk that renders any attempt at conversation or healthy, constructive debate impossible. By our very nature, we’re a social species. As such, our communication quickly falls apart when we extract vital tools from the process. In a digital environment, we’re not physically present with one another. When so much of how we communicate depends upon our facial expressions, body language, and tone of voice, problems of miscommunication can, and will, arise. For individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, or ASD, communication is an even bigger challenge. Fortunately,…

The Building Blocks of Better Autism Programs in Public Schools

There is no single way to teach children with autism. But regardless of the methods a school may choose, it is no mystery what helps these children thrive in the classroom. Calm, not chaos. Lessons tailored to the individual’s needs, and opportunities to work on language development. Unfortunately, programs that include all of these elements are rare. While these efforts are beneficial to the development of children with autism, John McLaughlin, the Director of research and analytics at ChanceLight Behavioral Health, Therapy and Education Solutions, is shocked by the rarity of established programs that include the aforementioned elements for children. According to McLaughlin, U.S. federal law states the requirement of public schools to educate children from all backgrounds, regardless of their physical or intellectual capabilities. Unfortunately, the law isn’t quite specific as far as…

Page 1 of 912345Last »

Want More Information?

* = Required
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.